Nutrient Information: Vitamin K (phylloquinone)

  LogixPath Chef Home Page   >   Nutrients on Nutrition Label   >     Nutrient Information

Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
Nutrient Category: Vitamins and Other Components
Unit Name: µg
Nutrient Summary: It is important for blood coagulation and bone metabolism.


Sample Foods High in:
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Chard, swiss, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
830 µg 922.22%
Mustard greens, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
592.7 µg 658.56%
Spinach, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
493.6 µg 548.44%
Kale, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
418.5 µg 465.00%
Turnip greens, cooked, boiled, drained, with salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
367.6 µg 408.44%
Chives, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
212.7 µg 236.33%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


Sponsored Links:


Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary It is important for blood coagulation and bone metabolism.
Nutrient Function Vitamin K functions as a coenzyme for biological reactions involved in:
• Blood coagulation (blood clotting)
• Bone osteocalcin metabolism and health
• Positively affect calcium homeostasis and may work synergistically with vitamin D

Vitamin K converts certain residues in proteins into biologically active forms, such as osteocalcin (found in bone) and matrix Gla protein (originally found in bone, later on also found in vascular smooth muscle and cartilage). It possibly plays roles in the prevention of some chronic diseases, such as osteopenia and osteoporosis (but more research is needed).

Phylloquinone (vitamin K1) is the plant form of vitamin K, it is the major dietary form of Vitamin K. Menaquinone forms (vitamin K2) are produced by bacteria in the lower bowel, and also exists in various animal-based and fermented foods.

Vitamin K is rapidly metabolized and excreted. It is a fat-soluble nutrient. Body stores relatively low amount of vitamin K in blood and tissue compare to other fat-soluble vitamins.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
Phylloquinone Vitamin K1:
• Leafy green vegetables: such as Swiss chard, mustard greens, spinach, kale, collard greens, turnip greens, broccoli
• Soy and canola oils (has higher absorption rate)
• Margarine
• Some fruits: such as kiwifruit, avocados, blueberries and figs

Menaquinone Vitamin K2:
• Poultry meat, dairy foods, and eggs
• Some cheeses
• Natto (Japanese fermented soybeans)

Notes:
• Vitamin K is a fat-soluble nutrient, fat-containing meal can enhance the absorption of Vitamin K.
Deficiency Health Effects In general, clinically significant vitamin K deficiency is extremely rare. Only limited individuals with various lipid malabsorption syndromes or treated with drugs known to interfere with vitamin K metabolism may have vitamin K deficiency. If it occurs, the vitamin K deficiency may cause longer blood clotting time or bleeding. It may also reduce bone strength and increase the risk of getting osteoporosis.
Effects if Above Upper Limit Data were insufficient to set a Upper Limit for vitamin K. No adverse effects have been reported with high intakes of vitamin K (both phylloquinone and menaquinone forms) from food or supplements.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) article: Vitamin K
• Examine.com article: Vitamin K Supplement



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 30 µg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 55 µg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 60 µg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 75 µg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 120 µg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 120 µg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 120 µg
Male Senior 71 or older: 120 µg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 60 µg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 75 µg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 90 µg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 90 µg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 90 µg
Female Senior 71 or older: 90 µg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 90 µg
Female Lactation (>18): 90 µg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 120 µg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


View Top Food Sources   |   Food Nutrition Lookup   |   Nutrients Search   |     Food Nutrition Label Explained