Nutrient Information: Thiamin (Vitamin B-1)

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Thiamin (Vitamin B-1)
Nutrient Category: Vitamins and Other Components
Unit Name: mg
Nutrient Summary: Also known as Vitamin B1 and aneurin. It helps the body generate energy from foods.


Sample Foods High in:
Thiamin (Vitamin B-1)  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Corn flour, masa, enriched, white
Category: Cereal Grains and Pasta
1.475 mg 134.09%
Flour, wheat, all-purpose, enriched, unbleached
Category: Cereal Grains and Pasta
1.05 mg 95.45%
Pork, fresh, loin, tenderloin, separable lean only, cooked, broiled
Category: Pork Products
0.988 mg 89.82%
Pork, fresh, loin, country-style ribs, separable lean and fat, bone-in, cooked, roasted
Category: Pork Products
0.82 mg 74.55%
Nuts, macadamia nuts, dry roasted, without salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
0.71 mg 64.55%
Nuts, pistachio nuts, dry roasted, without salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
0.695 mg 63.18%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Also known as Vitamin B1 and aneurin. It helps the body generate energy from foods.
Nutrient Function • Conversion of food into energy
• Help nervous system function
• Important for the growth, development, and function of the cells

It functions as a coenzyme in the metabolism of carbohydrates and branched-chain amino acids. Scientists are studying thiamin's effect and health benefits to a certain diseases, such as diabetes, heart failure, and Alzheimer’s disease.

As a B vitamin, Thiamin is water-soluble. Water-soluble vitamin moves directly into the blood, and not well stored in the body.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
• Whole grains
• Enriched grain products: such as bread, cereal, pasta, rice
• Pork and ham
• Fortified meat substitutes
• Beans (such as black beans and soybeans) and peas
• Nuts
• Sunflower seeds
Deficiency Health Effects Signs and symptoms of thiamine deficiency:
• Anorexia
• Weight loss
• Mental changes such as apathy, decreased short-term memory, confusion, and irritability
• Muscle weakness
• Cardiovascular effects such as enlarged heart

In developing countries, the disease related to thiamin deficiency is beriberi with additional symptoms of tingling and numbness in the feet and hands, loss of muscle, and poor reflexes. In industrialized countries, severe thiamin deficiency is likely to be related to chronic heavy alcohol consumption with limited food consumption, the potential consequence is tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, severe memory loss, disorientation, and confusion.
Effects if Above Upper Limit Only a small percentage of a high dose of thiamin is absorbed. The absorption declines rapidly when intaking level is above 5 mg and they are excreted in urine. There is no sufficient adverse effects data to be used to define its Upper Limit.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) articles: Thiamin (Vitamin B1)



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 0.5 mg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 0.6 mg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 0.9 mg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 1.2 mg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 1.2 mg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 1.2 mg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 1.2 mg
Male Senior 71 or older: 1.2 mg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 0.9 mg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 1 mg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 1.1 mg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 1.1 mg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 1.1 mg
Female Senior 71 or older: 1.1 mg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 1.4 mg
Female Lactation (>18): 1.4 mg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 1.2 mg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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