Nutrient Information: Calcium, Ca

  LogixPath Chef Home Page   >   Nutrients on Nutrition Label   >     Nutrient Information

Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Calcium, Ca
Nutrient Category: Minerals
Unit Name: mg
Nutrient Summary: Calcium plays a key role in bone and teeth health. We should take adequate calcium to help the bone and teeth formation and development.


Sample Foods High in:
Calcium, Ca  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Cheese, parmesan, shredded
Category: Dairy and Egg Products
1,253 mg 125.30%
Fish, sardine, Atlantic, canned in oil, drained solids with bone
Category: Finfish and Shellfish Products
382 mg 38.20%
Nuts, almonds, oil roasted, lightly salted
Category: Nut and Seed Products
291 mg 29.10%
Kale, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
254 mg 25.40%
Yogurt, plain, skim milk
Category: Dairy and Egg Products
199 mg 19.90%
Soybeans, green, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
197 mg 19.70%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


Sponsored Links:


Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Calcium plays a key role in bone and teeth health. We should take adequate calcium to help the bone and teeth formation and development.
Nutrient Function • Bone formation and development
• Teeth formation
• Constriction and relaxation of blood vessels
• Help muscles to contract
• Nervous system function: transmit messages between the brain and body parts
• Help release hormones and enzymes

Notes:
• Vitamin D helps absorption of calcium.
• Calcium absorption declines when a person is aging.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
• Dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese
• Green vegetables, such as kale, broccoli, Chinese cabbage (napa cabbage), and collard greens
• Tofu (made with calcium sulfate)
• Canned seafood with bones (e.g., sardines and salmon)
• Nuts, such as almond
• Calcium-fortified orange juice
• Fortified plant-based beverages (e.g., soy, rice, and almond)
• Fortified ready-to-eat cereals

For vegan diet (pure vegetarian), the key food sources of Calcium are:
• Fortified cereals
• Dark-green leafy vegetables, such as bok choy, broccoli, collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, watercress
• Fortified juices, figs
• Fortified soy products
• Nuts (almonds) and seeds (sesame seeds)

note:
1) Calcium may be poorly absorbed from foods that are rich in oxalic acid or phytic acid. Example foods:
• Rich in oxalic acid: spinach, sweet potatoes, and beans
• Rich in phytic acid: seeds, nuts, and whole grains
2) Calcium from foods are generally preferred over calcium supplementation because of the concern on the potential increasing risk of developing kidney stones.
Deficiency Health Effects The primary effects of calcium deficiency (caused by inadequate intake or poor intestinal absorption) include:
• Osteopenia (lower than normal bone-mineral density)
• Osteoporosis (very low bone-mineral density)
• Increased risk of bone fractures
Effects if Above Upper Limit Excess intake of calcium may increase the level of calcium in the blood. The primary effects of excess intake are:
• Kidney stones
• Hypercalcemia and renal insufficiency
• Decrease absorption of certain minerals (such as magnesium, zinc)
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) article: Calcium
• Book: Non-Pharmacological Management of Osteoporosis: Exercise, Nutrition, Fall and Fracture Prevention
Additional Information Knowledge on Wikipedia:
Calcium supplement



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 700 mg 2,500 mg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 1,000 mg 2,500 mg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 1,300 mg 3,000 mg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 1,300 mg 3,000 mg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 1,300 mg 2,500 mg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 1,300 mg 2,500 mg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 1,300 mg 2,000 mg
Male Senior 71 or older: 1,200 mg 2,000 mg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 1,300 mg 3,000 mg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 1,300 mg 3,000 mg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 1,000 mg 2,500 mg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 1,000 mg 2,500 mg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 1,200 mg 2,000 mg
Female Senior 71 or older: 1,200 mg 2,000 mg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 1,000 mg 2,500 mg
Female Lactation (>18): 1,000 mg 2,500 mg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 1,300 mg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


View Top Food Sources   |   Food Nutrition Lookup   |   Nutrients Search   |     Food Nutrition Label Explained