Nutrient Information: Folate, total

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Folate, total (Vitamin B-9)
Nutrient Category: Vitamins and Other Components
Unit Name: µg
Nutrient Summary: Folate functions as a coenzyme in the synthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and metabolism of amino acids. Body needs folate to make DNA, and to make cells to divide.
Nutrient Function: • Synthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA)
• Red blood cell formation and healthy cell growth and f ... (Continue the page to read more)


Sample Foods High in:
Folate, total (Vitamin B-9)  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Chicken, liver, all classes, cooked, pan-fried
Category: Poultry Products
560 µg 140.00%
Seeds, sunflower seed kernels from shell, dry roasted, with salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
237 µg 59.25%
Turnip greens, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
194 µg 48.50%
Spinach, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
194 µg 48.50%
Lentils, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt
Category: Legumes and Legume Products
181 µg 45.25%
Soybeans, mature seeds, sprouted, cooked, stir-fried
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
127 µg 31.75%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Folate functions as a coenzyme in the synthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and metabolism of amino acids. Body needs folate to make DNA, and to make cells to divide.
Nutrient Function • Synthesis of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA)
• Red blood cell formation and healthy cell growth and function
• Protein metabolism
• Is an essential component of prenatal vitamins, it prevents birth neural tube defects in a baby's brain or spine

Folate includes:
1. food folate: naturally occurring form of folates in food.
2. folic acid: monoglutamate form used in fortified foods and dietary supplements.

DFE stands for Dietary Folate Equivalents. Food folate is about 50% lower bioavailable than folic acid. DFE is the value adjusted for differences in the absorption of food folate and folic acid. DFE value is used as the recommended daily value for Folate.

Body stores about half folate in the liver and the remainder in blood and body tissues.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
• Chicken and beef livers
• Dark green vegetables, such as spinach, mustard greens, asparagus, and brussels sprouts
• Beans, legumes and peas
• Fruits, such as oranges and orange juice, avocados
• Enriched with folic acid grain products, such as bread, cereal, pasta, rice
Deficiency Health Effects Chronic inadequate folate intake results in macrocytic anemia. At first, erythrocyte count gets lower, and then hematocrit and hemoglobin value get lower. Moderate to severe macrocytic anemia may have the symptoms:

• Weakness and fatigue
• Difficulty in concentrating
• Irritability and depression
• Headache

Note: coexisting deficiencies of folate and iron or Vitamin B12 may interfere with the diagnosis of their deficiencies because all of them may lead to hematological changes.
Effects if Above Upper Limit The Upper Limit value of folate does not include naturally occurring food folate. And no adverse effects have been associated with the excess consumption of the amounts of folate normally found in fortified foods.

Excess folate from supplement may obscure and potentially delay the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency which can result in an increased risk of progressive and unrecognized neurological damage. Large doses of folate supplements might also worsen the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) Article: Folate
• Mayo Clinic Article: Folate (folic acid)



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 150 µg 300 µg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 200 µg 400 µg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 300 µg 600 µg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 400 µg 800 µg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Male Senior 71 or older: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 300 µg 600 µg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 400 µg 800 µg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Female Senior 71 or older: 400 µg 1,000 µg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 600 µg 1,000 µg
Female Lactation (>18): 500 µg 1,000 µg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 400 µg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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