Nutrient Information: Zinc, Zn

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Zinc, Zn
Nutrient Category: Minerals
Unit Name: mg
Nutrient Summary: Zinc is an essential mineral, it is involved in numerous aspects of cellular metabolism. Zinc facilitates metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, and fats. It helps to make proteins and DNA, the genetic material in all cells. It also helps the immune system fight off invading bacteria and viruses.
Nutrient Function: Zinc is catalyst for nearly 100 specific enzymes to facilitate metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, ... (Continue the page to read more)


Sample Foods High in:
Zinc, Zn  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Mollusks, oyster, eastern, wild, cooked, moist heat
Category: Finfish and Shellfish Products
78.6 mg 982.50%
Beef, chuck eye steak, boneless, separable lean only, trimmed to 0" fat, all grades, cooked, grilled
Category: Beef Products
10.54 mg 131.75%
Seeds, pumpkin and squash seeds, whole, roasted, without salt
Category: Nut and Seed Products
10.3 mg 128.75%
Beef, loin, top sirloin cap steak, boneless, separable lean and fat, trimmed to 1/8" fat, all grades, cooked, grilled
Category: Beef Products
9.99 mg 124.88%
Nuts, cashew nuts, dry roasted, without salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
5.6 mg 70.00%
Seeds, chia seeds, dried
Category: Nut and Seed Products
4.58 mg 57.25%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Zinc is an essential mineral, it is involved in numerous aspects of cellular metabolism. Zinc facilitates metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, and fats. It helps to make proteins and DNA, the genetic material in all cells. It also helps the immune system fight off invading bacteria and viruses.
Nutrient Function Zinc is catalyst for nearly 100 specific enzymes to facilitate metabolism of protein, carbohydrates, and fats for the structural integrity of certain proteins and in the regulation of gene expression. The key functions of zinc are:

• Body growth and development
• Play role in improving immune function
• Protein synthesis
• DNA synthesis
• Proper sense of taste and smell
• Help blood clot
• Help wound healing: zinc helps maintain the integrity of skin and mucosal membranes
• May help to slow the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) progression

More than 85% of the body's total zinc is in the skeletal muscle and bone.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
Animal foods:
• Shellfish, such as oyster, crab, lobster, clam
• Red meats, such as beef and pork
• Poultry
• Dairy products, such as egg and milk

Plant based foods:
• Beans and peas
• Nuts and seeds, such as pumpkin seeds and pecans
• Whole grains. Refined grains lost as much as 80 percent of total zinc during milling because zinc is mainly found in the germ and bran portions of grains which are removed in the process.
• Fortified cereals

Note:
1) Animal based foods with adequate protein has higher bioavailability of zinc
2) Phytic acid or phytate (found in some plant based foods, such as beans, seeds, nuts, and grains) may reduce zinc bioavailability. Some food processing can help destroy phytates, such as sprouting, cooking, fermenting, yeast leavening, etc. Learn more at WebMD: Foods High in Phytic Acid.
3) Iron supplement taken without food may decrease zinc absorption
4) Calcium and phosphorus may decrease zinc absorption
Deficiency Health Effects Zinc deficiency is rare in North America. The primary symptom of zinc deficiency is impaired growth velocity. Main symptoms are:

• Slow growth in infants and children
• Impaired immune function
• Hair loss
• Diarrhea
• Delayed sexual development in adolescents and impotence in men
• Eye and skin sores
• Loss of appetite
Effects if Above Upper Limit There is no evidence of adverse effects from intake of naturally occurring zinc in foods. The adverse effects associated with chronic intake of supplemental zinc include:

• Suppression of the immune system and impair immune function
• Decrease of high density lipoprotein (HDL, "Good") cholesterol
• Reduce copper metabolism
• Acute effects: such as gastrointestinal distress, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, or even vomiting
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) Article: Zinc
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) Article: Dietary Supplements in the Time of COVID-19
• healthline.com Article: Zinc: Everything You Need to Know



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 3 mg 7 mg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 5 mg 12 mg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 8 mg 23 mg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 11 mg 34 mg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 11 mg 40 mg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 11 mg 40 mg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 11 mg 40 mg
Male Senior 71 or older: 11 mg 40 mg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 8 mg 23 mg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 9 mg 34 mg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 8 mg 40 mg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 8 mg 40 mg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 8 mg 40 mg
Female Senior 71 or older: 8 mg 40 mg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 11 mg 40 mg
Female Lactation (>18): 12 mg 40 mg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 11 mg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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