Nutrient Information: Cholesterol

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Cholesterol
Nutrient Category: Fats and Fatty Acids (Lipids)
Unit Name: mg
Nutrient Summary: Cholesterol contains lipid (fat) and protein. There are two types of cholesterols: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, "Bad") cholesterol and High-density lipoprotein (HDL, "Good") cholesterol.
Human bodies (mainly liver) can produce enough cholesterol to meet body's metabolic and structural , so keep the intake of dietary cholesterol as low as possible to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
Nutrient Function: • Is a structural component of cell membranes.
• Is necessary for the production of bile, a fluid m ... (Continue the page to read more)


Sample Foods High in:
Cholesterol  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Egg, duck, whole, fresh, raw
Category: Dairy and Egg Products
884 mg 294.67%
Chicken, liver, all classes, cooked, pan-fried
Category: Poultry Products
564 mg 188.00%
Egg, whole, cooked, fried
Category: Dairy and Egg Products
401 mg 133.67%
Beef, variety meats and by-products, liver, cooked, braised
Category: Beef Products
396 mg 132.00%
Butter, stick, salted
Category: Dairy and Egg Products
235 mg 78.33%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Cholesterol contains lipid (fat) and protein. There are two types of cholesterols: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, "Bad") cholesterol and High-density lipoprotein (HDL, "Good") cholesterol.
Human bodies (mainly liver) can produce enough cholesterol to meet body's metabolic and structural , so keep the intake of dietary cholesterol as low as possible to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
Nutrient Function • Is a structural component of cell membranes.
• Is necessary for the production of bile, a fluid made by the liver that aids in the digestion of fat in the intestine.
• Used for making some hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, and aldosterone.

"Bad" cholesterol: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Cholesterol is carried from the liver to arteries and body tissues, buildup of the LDL inside of artery walls can increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
"Good" cholesterol: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Cholesterol travels from body tissues back to the liver, where it is broken down and removed. Higher levels of HDL in the blood can help prevent cholesterol buildup in arteries.

Observational studies have shown that increased dietary cholesterol intake leads to a net increase in plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
Animal origin foods:
• High amount cholesterol in: liver and egg yolks
• Some seafoods: such as shellfish (lobster and shrimp) and some fish (salmon and sardines)
• Beef fat (tallow and suet), chicken fat, and pork fat (lard)
• Dairy products (such as milk, cheese, and yogurt)
• Meats and poultry
• Processed meat and poultry products (such as bacon, hot dogs, jerky, some luncheon meats, and sausages)
• Spreads (such as butter, cream cheese, and sour cream)
Deficiency Health Effects All tissues are capable of synthesizing enough cholesterol to meet body's metabolic and structural needs. So there is no "Required Adequate Intake" amount. Experts recommend that the lower the dietary cholesterol intake, the better.
Effects if Above Upper Limit Much evidence indicates a positive linear trend between cholesterol intake and LDL cholesterol concentration. So there is no Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) was set for cholesterol because any incremental increase in cholesterol intake can potentially increase the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).
External References Learn more by reading The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
or explore US FDA Website: FDA Interactive Nutrition Facts Label - Cholesterol



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 150 mg 150 mg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 210 mg 210 mg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 270 mg 270 mg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Male Senior 71 or older: 300 mg 300 mg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 270 mg 270 mg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 300 mg 300 mg
Female Senior 71 or older: 300 mg 300 mg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 300 mg 300 mg
Female Lactation (>18): 300 mg 300 mg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 300 mg 300 mg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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