Nutrient Information: Fiber, total dietary

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Fiber, total dietary
Nutrient Category: Carbohydrates and Sugar
Unit Name: g
Nutrient Summary: Dietary fiber is carbohydrate and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants and is not digested and absorbed in the small intestine. It can lower blood glucose and cholesterol levels, increase the frequency of bowel movements, and reduce calorie intake.
Nutrient Function: Dietary fibers from nature plant foods:
Soluble dietary fiber: dissolves in water and brok ... (Continue the page to read more)


Sample Foods High in:
Fiber, total dietary  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Corn bran, crude
Category: Cereal Grains and Pasta
79 g 316.00%
Seeds, pumpkin and squash seeds, whole, roasted, without salt
Category: Nut and Seed Products
18.4 g 73.60%
Nuts, almonds, dry roasted, with salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
11 g 44.00%
Oats (Includes foods for USDA's Food Distribution Program)
Category: Cereal Grains and Pasta
10.6 g 42.40%
Avocados, raw, California
Category: Fruits and Fruit Juices
6.8 g 27.20%
Lotus root, raw
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
4.9 g 19.60%
Peas, green, frozen, unprepared (Includes foods for USDA's Food Distribution Program)
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
4.5 g 18.00%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Dietary fiber is carbohydrate and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants and is not digested and absorbed in the small intestine. It can lower blood glucose and cholesterol levels, increase the frequency of bowel movements, and reduce calorie intake.
Nutrient Function Dietary fibers from nature plant foods:
Soluble dietary fiber: dissolves in water and broken down by bacteria in the large intestine and provides some calories. The viscous fiber can help lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad") cholesterol levels in the blood by absorption of dietary fat and cholesterol. Also can slow the digestion of carbohydrates to help control the level of blood glucose.
Insoluble dietary fiber: does not dissolve in water and is not a source of calories. These poorly fermented fibers can improve the movement of food and waste through the digestive system and help promote bowel movements health and regularity.

Both dietary fiber can make you feel full so that you will eat less, and also delay digestion and absorption of nutrients.

Functional Fiber: isolated, extracted, or synthetic fibers that have beneficial physiological effects in humans.

Prebiotic function: Fiber is a prebiotic which functions as the food to stimulate the growth and activity of gut bacteria "microbiota". Gut microbiota are essential to nutrient metabolism and regulation of the immune system.

In summary, the benefits of fibers are:
• Help bowel movements
• Assist normalizing blood lipid levels
• Slowdown blood glucose responses to foods
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
Soluble dietary fiber:
• Oat bran, barley, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils, peas
• Some fruits: such as pears, figs, nectarines
• Some vegetables: such as brussels sprouts, avocados, broccoli, carrots

Insoluble dietary fiber:
• Wheat bran, whole grains
• Some vegetables: such as cauliflower, green beans, potatoes
Deficiency Health Effects Fibers are not essential nutrients, so inadequate intakes do not result in biochemical or clinical symptoms of a deficiency. Lack of fibers may cause inadequate fecal bulk which impacts bowel movements.
Effects if Above Upper Limit No serious chronic adverse effects have been observed, though occasional adverse gastrointestinal symptoms are observed when consuming some of the isolated or synthetic fibers. No Upper Limit number was defined for Dietary Fiber or Functional Fiber.

Foods that are rich in fiber may alter body's mineral metabolism, especially when phytate is present. Fibers may impact the absorption of a certain minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• US FDA Website: Interactive Nutrition Facts Label - Dietary Fiber
• Healthline.com: Soluble and Insoluble Fiber
• Healthline.com: What Are Prebiotics?
Additional Information Types of grain processes:
Whole grains: contain the entire grain seeds. Nothing added during the processes.
Refined grains: remove bran and germ during the processes. As a result, some nutrients, such as dietary fiber, iron, and Vitamin B, are removed.
Enriched grains: is refined grains with added nutrients (such as iron, Vitamin B, thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin) lost during the grains refining process. However, dietary fiber cannot be replaced.



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 19 g
Child 4 to 8 years old: 25 g
Male 9 to 13 years old: 31 g
Male 14 to 18 years old: 38 g
Male 19 to 30 years old: 38 g
Male 31 to 50 years old: 38 g
Male 51 to 70 years old: 30 g
Male Senior 71 or older: 30 g
Female 9 to 13 years old: 26 g
Female 14 to 18 years old: 26 g
Female 19 to 30 years old: 25 g
Female 31 to 50 years old: 25 g
Female 51 to 70 years old: 21 g
Female Senior 71 or older: 21 g
Female Pregnancy (>18): 28 g
Female Lactation (>18): 29 g
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 28 g


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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