Nutrient Information: Fluoride, F

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Fluoride, F
Nutrient Category: Minerals
Unit Name: µg
Nutrient Summary: Fluoride is vital for the health of teeth and bones. It helps to prevent tooth decay and stimulate new bone formation and keep bones strong.
Nutrient Function: • Help protect teeth by strengthening the outer enamel surface
• Help bones grow and stay strong an ... (Continue the page to read more)


Sample Foods High in:
Fluoride, F  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Raisins, dark, seedless (Includes foods for USDA's Food Distribution Program)
Category: Fruits and Fruit Juices
233.9 µg 7.80%
Grape juice, canned or bottled, unsweetened, without added ascorbic acid
Category: Fruits and Fruit Juices
138 µg 4.60%
Potatoes, boiled, cooked in skin, flesh, with salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
49.4 µg 1.65%
Carrots, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
47.5 µg 1.58%
Spinach, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
37.8 µg 1.26%
Salami, cooked, beef
Category: Sausages and Luncheon Meats
41.2 µg 1.37%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Fluoride is vital for the health of teeth and bones. It helps to prevent tooth decay and stimulate new bone formation and keep bones strong.
Nutrient Function • Help protect teeth by strengthening the outer enamel surface
• Help bones grow and stay strong and lower the risk of bone fractures (more scientific research is needed)

It requires frequent exposure to fluoride throughout a person's lifetime to achieve and maintain adequate concentrations of the ion in dental plaque and enamel.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
• Fluoridated water from some cities' public water supplies
• Fluoridated drinking water or beverage
• Most toothpaste and some mouthwashes contain fluoride
• Some marine fish, especially if eating with bones (such as sardines)
• Brewed tea. Tea leaves can accumulate fluoride, the concentration depends on the dry tea used, the fluoride concentration of the water, and brewing time.
• Fluoride supplements (usually for children)

Note: the absorption will be reduced if taking Fluoride with milk, infant formula, or foods with high concentrations of calcium.
Deficiency Health Effects The primary effect of inadequate fluoride intake is an increased risk of dental decay.
Effects if Above Upper Limit The potential effects of excess intake are:

• Enamel fluorosis for pre-eruptive development of teeth (discolored or dented teeth)
• Skeletal fluorosis (elevated bone-ash fluoride concentrations). Stage 1 skeletal fluorosis is stiffness or pain in the joints. Stage 2 may include osteosclerosis or even death in rare cases. Skeletal fluorosis is very rare.

The Upper Limit of fluoride for individuals aged 9 years and older is 10 mg/day (including food, water, and supplements) for a period of 10 years or longer.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) article: Fluoride



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 700 µg 1,300 µg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 1,000 µg 2,200 µg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 2,000 µg 10,000 µg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 4,000 µg 10,000 µg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 4,000 µg 10,000 µg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 4,000 µg 10,000 µg
Male Senior 71 or older: 4,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 2,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female Senior 71 or older: 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 3,000 µg 10,000 µg
Female Lactation (>18): 3,000 µg 10,000 µg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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