Nutrient Information: Manganese, Mn

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Manganese, Mn
Nutrient Category: Minerals
Unit Name: mg
Nutrient Summary: Manganese is involved in the formation of bone and in specific reactions related to protein amino acid, cholesterol, and carbohydrate metabolism.
Nutrient Function: • Help cartilage and bone formation in combination with other minerals and vitamins
• Helps metabol ... (Continue the page to read more)


Sample Foods High in:
Manganese, Mn  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Oats (Includes foods for USDA's Food Distribution Program)
Category: Cereal Grains and Pasta
4.916 mg 273.11%
Flour, whole wheat, unenriched
Category: Cereal Grains and Pasta
3.56 mg 197.78%
Nuts, hazelnuts or filberts, dry roasted, without salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
5.55 mg 308.33%
Nuts, pecans, dry roasted, without salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
3.933 mg 218.50%
Seeds, pumpkin and squash seed kernels, roasted, without salt
Category: Nut and Seed Products
4.49 mg 249.44%
Soybeans, mature seeds, sprouted, cooked, stir-fried
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
1.133 mg 62.94%
Spinach, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
0.935 mg 51.94%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Manganese is involved in the formation of bone and in specific reactions related to protein amino acid, cholesterol, and carbohydrate metabolism.
Nutrient Function • Help cartilage and bone formation in combination with other minerals and vitamins
• Helps metabolize protein amino acids, cholesterol, and carbohydrates.
• Blood clotting and wound healing in conjunction with vitamin K
• Manganese is a cofactor for many enzymes
• Make energy and protect cells from damage

Manganese is taken up from the blood by the liver and transported to extrahepatic tissues by transferrin. Most of the absorbed manganese is excreted via bile into the feces very rapidly, and only a small amount is retained in bone, liver, pancreas, kidney, and brain.

Note:
• Low serum ferritin concentration may increase manganese absorption. Men usually has higher serum ferritin concentrations, it has been shown that men absorb significantly less manganese compared to women.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
• Whole grains: such as oatmeal, whole wheat flour
• Shellfish: such as clams, oysters, and mussels
• Nuts: such as hazelnuts, pecans
• Beans: such as soybean, Spanish peanuts, black beans
• Vegetables: such as soybean sprouts, spinach, kale, sweet potato
• Fruits: such as pineapple, wild blueberries
• Tea beverages

Note:
1) Calcium may reduce manganese absorption
2) Phytate may decrease manganese absorption
Deficiency Health Effects Manganese deficiency is very rare in the United States. A few studies observed that manganese depleted persons developed symptoms:

• Weak bones and poor growth in children
• Skin scaly dermatitis
• decreased serum cholesterol (hypocholesterolemia)
Effects if Above Upper Limit The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) is based on elevated blood manganese concentrations and neurotoxicity as the critical adverse effects. Studies have not shown any harm from the manganese in food and beverages.

Manganese toxicity is observed for the people who inhale manganese dust from welding or mining work. Manganese toxicity may cause central nervous system effects similar to those of Parkinson’s disease.

People with chronic liver disease may have larger adverse effects of excess manganese intake, probably because elimination of manganese in bile is impaired. These individuals should be careful in taking manganese supplements.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) article: Manganese



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 1.2 mg 2 mg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 1.5 mg 3 mg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 1.9 mg 6 mg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 2.2 mg 9 mg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 2.3 mg 11 mg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 2.3 mg 11 mg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 2.3 mg 11 mg
Male Senior 71 or older: 2.3 mg 11 mg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 1.6 mg 6 mg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 1.6 mg 9 mg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 1.8 mg 11 mg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 1.8 mg 11 mg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 1.8 mg 11 mg
Female Senior 71 or older: 1.8 mg 11 mg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 2 mg 11 mg
Female Lactation (>18): 2.6 mg 11 mg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 2.3 mg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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