Nutrient Information: Copper, Cu

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Nutrient Key Information 
Nutrient Name: Copper, Cu
Nutrient Category: Minerals
Unit Name: mg
Nutrient Summary: Your body uses copper to carry out many important functions, such as antioxidant, iron metabolism to produce red blood cells, making energy, connective tissues, and bone health.


Sample Foods High in:
Copper, Cu  ( Additional Top Food Sources )
Food Description Nutrient Amount1 Daily Value%2
Beef, variety meats and by-products, liver, cooked, pan-fried
Category: Beef Products
14.588 mg 1,620.89%
Mollusks, oyster, eastern, wild, cooked, moist heat
Category: Finfish and Shellfish Products
5.707 mg 634.11%
Nuts, cashew nuts, dry roasted, without salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
2.22 mg 246.67%
Seeds, sunflower seed kernels from shell, dry roasted, with salt added
Category: Nut and Seed Products
1.83 mg 203.33%
Crustaceans, lobster, northern, cooked, moist heat
Category: Finfish and Shellfish Products
1.55 mg 172.22%
Soybeans, mature seeds, sprouted, cooked, stir-fried
Category: Vegetables and Vegetable Products
0.527 mg 58.56%
1 Nutrient amount is in 100 gram food
2 Use Female 31-50 years old as Daily Value reference


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Nutrient Detail Information
Nutrient Summary Your body uses copper to carry out many important functions, such as antioxidant, iron metabolism to produce red blood cells, making energy, connective tissues, and bone health.
Nutrient Function Copper plays important role in several functional areas:

• Iron metabolism to produce red blood cells: ferrous iron oxidation to bind iron to transferrin
• Anti oxidative damage
• Collagen and connective tissue formation and maintain healthy bone
• Nervous system function such as neuropeptide activation and neurotransmitter synthesis
• Help to activate and maintain immune systems
• Energy production

Note:
• The absorption rate decreases when the intake amount increases.
• The copper excretion increases when more copper is absorbed which regulates the copper level in the body to protect against copper deficiency and toxicity.
• Copper may interact with other nutrients, such as zinc, iron, molybdenum, dietary protein, sulfate. Very high intake of zinc may decrease copper absorption; high iron may reduce copper absorption for infant.
Food Sources
Top Food Sources
• Organ meats: such as beef liver
• Crustaceans and shellfish: such as oyster, lobster
• Nuts and seeds: such as cashew nuts, walnuts, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds
• Shiitake and mushrooms
• Beans: such as black beans and soybeans
• Dark chocolate and cocoa
• Wheat bran cereals and whole-grain products
Deficiency Health Effects Copper deficiency in humans is rare. However, if it occurs, here are the possible symptoms:
• Normocytic anemia or hypochromic anemia
• Leukopenia
• Neutropenia
• Osteoporosis
Effects if Above Upper Limit The copper toxicity is rare in healthy individuals, however it can occur for the people who have genetic problem with copper homeostasis or other special diseases. It could also occur if the corrosion copper water pipe is leaching copper.

The Intake Upper Limit for copper is based on liver damage as the critical endpoint. Severe copper toxicity can cause liver damage and heart failure.
External References Learn more at:
• The National Academies of Science, Engineering, Medicine publication: Dietary Reference Intakes
• NIH (National Institutes of Health) article: Copper
• Healthline.com article: The Link Between Copper and Nutrition



Daily Value Age Group Recommended Daily Values Daily Value Upper Limits
Toddler 1 to 3 years old: 0.34 mg 1 mg
Child 4 to 8 years old: 0.44 mg 3 mg
Male 9 to 13 years old: 0.7 mg 5 mg
Male 14 to 18 years old: 0.89 mg 8 mg
Male 19 to 30 years old: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Male 31 to 50 years old: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Male 51 to 70 years old: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Male Senior 71 or older: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Female 9 to 13 years old: 0.7 mg 5 mg
Female 14 to 18 years old: 0.89 mg 8 mg
Female 19 to 30 years old: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Female 31 to 50 years old: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Female 51 to 70 years old: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Female Senior 71 or older: 0.9 mg 10 mg
Female Pregnancy (>18): 1 mg 10 mg
Female Lactation (>18): 1.3 mg 10 mg
FDA (Based on 2000 calorie daily diet): 0.9 mg


Dietary Reference Intakes The nutrient Dietary Reference Intakes and nutrition facts is from Institute of Medicine of National Academies 2006. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/11537
US FDA Nutrition Education Nutrition facts knowledge are based on U.S. FOOD & DRUG Administration Nutrition Education Resources & Materials. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/interactivenutritionfactslabel/
National Institutes of Health Nutrition facts knowledge are based on National Institutes of Health Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
Disclaimer The nutrient information provided here should not take the place of medical advice. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare providers (such as your doctor) about your dietary requirements which are best for your overall health. We also recommend you to read organization or professional reference documents or articles mentioned, but not limited to, in this page. Any mentions and reference links in this page don't represent our endorsement of their services and advice.


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